Does Your Restoration Contractor Measure Up?

Author: D16 March 13, 2014

We trust people that we have never met before, just because they have an MD or Dr. attached to their name. We will let someone fix our broken leg or even give one of our kids stitches just because they have right credentials. The MD or Dr. tells us they earned the right to be trusted.

 

Restoration contractors, too, can earn credentials that let you know they can be trusted to do the job right. Whether you are referring people to a contractor or looking for one to restore your own property, check to see what letters they may have with their names.

The first and most important credential to look for in a restoration contractor is if they are an IICRC Certified Firm. IICRC stands for the Institute of Inspection, Cleaning and Restoration Certification.

IICRC is a non-profit certification body founded to set standards for the inspection, cleaning and restoration service industries. IICRC certified firms must show proof of insurance, provide ongoing education for their workers and stay active in their industry by attending seminars, workshops and conventions. You can learn more about IICRC here.

There are additional certifications for contractor technicians, like the certifications that a doctor receives when passing the board qualifications for a specialty, such as an eye doctor or an orthopedic surgeon.

For example, one of our staff members has the following certifications: WRT for Water Restoration Technician , SRT for Certified Fire & Smoke Technician and ASD for an Applied Structural Drying Technician trained in commercial drying at Bolden’s Hydro-Lab.

Swartz Contracting feels that it is important for all of our employees to be knowledgeable and certified in the areas they work in. For example, all of our technicians who work to dry out your structure are WRT trained and certified by the IICRC. If Swartz is restoring your house after a fire, there will be at least one SRT-certified technician on the job.

Does your restoration contractor measure up to these standards? Be sure before you sign or refer!